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Posts Tagged ‘hafla’

I’m taking a break from my life in New Hampshire to visit friends and family this week in Maryland. There’s been a lot of binging on the things I’ve been missing. This includes ethnic food and, of course, belly dance shows and workshops. Happily, my visit coincided with Mia Naja’s annual Moments of Magic hafla, a great showcase of D.C. area talent. And although the show started pretty late, it was well worth the wait. There was a wonderful diversity of styles and talents.Sahara's Treasure at Mia Naja's show

Of course the highlight of my evening was seeing my former students performing as Sahara’s Treasure in a beautiful fusion of classic folkloric and cabaret styles. I’ve known some of these women from their very first class and seeing them owning the stage (after a minor hiccup with the sound system) was very rewarding. They’ve really danced into their own.Khiyatta at the Moment's of Magic showMy favorite fusion act was Khiyatta’s dramatic blend of tribal and ballet en pointe. Delicate spins and precise footwork became eerily dark in a synthesis that included moody arms and even floorwork.Ebony's Raqs Caravan Urban

My favorite new act (new to me!) was student troupe Raqs Caravan Urban under the direction of the legendary Ebony. They performed a fun and funky fusion that was high in energy and flawless in its execution. It was really refreshing to see such unique style.Bogoas of Maryland

Per usual, Bagoas kept the crowd in the palm of his hand with his mind blowing isolations and smooth musical interpretation. An artist in every sense of the word, Bagoas continues to pioneer the field in new and exciting ways.Phoenix Belly DanceI also saw my first performance with a live harp accompaniment. Phoenix’s veil solo piece was thoughtful and emotive. I’ll be waiting to see what develops in the coming years with this one!

There was also, of course, fabulous performances from Nadirah Nasreen, Ebony, Naimah, and Zaira al Zahara, as well! It was a great night.

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Ananke performing at haflaIt’s spring, which means it’s hafla season. If you’re into performing you probably have at least one upcoming show in the next few weeks. And even if you’re not performing I bet you’ll be attending one soon. So I thought it would be a good time to review the P’s and Q’s of performance etiquette.

Why it’s important. Being polite and respectful at shows is about maintaining your reputation amongst your fans and your fellow dancers. Your name is the single most important thing you have. If you tarnish it, then you don’t dance. It doesn’t matter how good your technique is. It’s that simple.

So what is good show etiquette for bellydancers? I’ve broken it down into three categories:

In the Audience

  • Be positive. You know Thumper’s Law: if you can’t say something nice, don’t say nothin’ at all. Help create a show atmosphere where women are supported for being who they are, where they are in their study of the dance. Plus, you never know who might overhear your negative comments.
  • Be supportive. Don’t underestimate the power of a reassuring smile, especially for dancers new to the stage. Clap along to the music, or zaghareet where appropriate. If you’re comfortable with a little Arabic, you can also call out encouraging phrases such as “Yalla!” or “Ya Habibi!” Be careful with hissing- while it may be appropriate in some tribal dance themed shows, cabaret or folkloric dancers will probably find it offensive.
  • Buy something. If the hafla is being held in a restaurant or lounge, you should at least buy a drink to support the establishment. The tables are there for paying customers, and your ticket or cover charge doesn’t count. This is just as true for dancers in the show who are sitting in the audience before or after their number!
  • Stay for the whole thing. Don’t just arrive for your number and then leave after your done. Be there to support all the dancers. If you really must leave for another engagement, then email the event organizer to let them know well ahead of time.
  • Wear your cover-up. For performers not on stage, and this includes any time you’re sitting in the audience, you should wear an appropriate cover-up. A transparent veil isn’t enough; aim for a caftan or change of clothes instead. You don’t want your costume to detract from the performance currently onstage. And if you haven’t performed yet, you don’t want to give away your look!
  • Promote where appropriate. Haflas often have a table with promotional materials such as flyers and business cards made available to the audience. Before placing your own materials here, check with the event organizer.

In the Dressing Room

  • Be on time. This helps the event organizers run the show smoothly. It also gives you more time to prepare backstage. Be sure to check in with the stage manager and to hand off your music, stage introduction, etc. to the DJ or emcee as soon as you arrive.
  • Come prepared. You should arrive in full costume and makeup with only some last minute pinning and adjustments needed. Triple check that you have everything you need before you leave. Have your dancer emergency kit (extra safety pins, costume tape, needle and thread, bobby pins, etc.) with you. Remember: “A lack of planning on my part does not constitute an emergency on someone else’s part.”
  • Don’t hog the dressing room. It’s rare to be in a dressing room that isn’t overcrowded. Do what you can to maximize the space by bringing in only what you must. Try to give everyone some mirror time, especially the dancers going on stage before you. And please please please don’t practice your routine in the dressing room.
  • Stay positive.  It’s good to remember that everyone prepares for a show differently. Some people might want to chit chat to ease their nerves, others may want time alone to recenter. Stay positive and cheerful. The “OMG I’m going to mess up!” neediness is draining for everyone. You’re already here. Take a breath. Have fun.
  • Offer some help. Other dancers may need assistance with zipping, pinning, clasping, etc. Lend a hand if you have a spare moment, especially if you’re already done with your performance.
  • Mind the door. Some dressing rooms open into an area that is public. Check to make sure that you won’t expose any dancers before exiting. Knock before entering if necessary.
  • Don’t bring anyone else. Your friend/significant other/children should not come with you to the dressing room. If you need support or assistance, ask another dancer. If you need a babysitter, hire one to stay with your kids in the audience!

On Stage

  • Shh! Be quiet. While waiting in the wings try not to make any noise or ruffle the curtains. This includes talking, zilling, jingling, etc.
  • Stick to time limits. Let me tell you a little secret. I’ve never seen someone dance over their time limit and be glad they made the decision. Sticking to your time limit is respectful to the event organizers and your fellow dancers. Also, the best performances leave the audience wanting more. It’s hard to go wrong leaving too soon.
  • Give credit. In your stage introduction (or emcee notes) you should acknowledge anyone that assisted you with the choreography or the routine. Giving credit also means acknowledging the musicians if dancing to live music, and acknowledging the audience with a bow or curtsey.
  • Have a prop retrieval plan. A lot of event organizers would prefer you to leave the stage with whatever props you had when you entered. Even if this is not the case, make sure someone will be there to collect your things before the next performance.
  • Entrance and exit (have them). Be in character before the audience can see you, and keep it until after you are well out of sight. Nothing ruins the moment like an artist getting into character on stage.

The Good, the Bad, the Ugly

Do you have an example of really great show etiquette? How about a horror story? Please post in the comments below or share it on the Facebook page.

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